Búsqueda en Artículos Técnicos
Los resultados en: Libros Tesis Revistas Gacetas Videos
Búsqueda sobre: RRP-014 EN REGISTRO INTERNO ,
Registros: del 1 al 5 de 5
1
1 de 5
Technical Change and Incorporated R and D in the Service Sector.
Amable, Bruno
Research Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton, North - Holland - Amsterdam
Research Policy Vol. 27 No 7 Noviembre (1998) página 655 - 675
INPUT-OUTPUT TABLESINCORPORATED TECHNOLOGYR AND D INTENSITYSERVICES
Servicio de referencia sección de publicaciones periódicas, Biblioteca "Dr. Nectario Andrade Labarca"
Ingles
RRP-014-001
The purpose of this article is to study the pattern of technical change in the service sector using an indicator of total technology intensity which takes account of the R and D incorporated in purchases of intermediates and equipment. The service sector does not appear as homogeneous and some services are major users of technology. An international comparison over eight countries does not show a clear pattern of convergence in total technology intensity except for the communication services. A comparison between France and Germany emphasises the differences between the relative importance of domestic and imported incorporated.

2 de 5
The Economic Impact of Canadian University R and D.
Martin, Fernand
Research Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton, North - Holland - Amsterdam
Research Policy Vol. 27 No 7 Noviembre (1998) página 677 - 687
IMPACTUNIVERSITYGROWTH THEORYR AND D
Servicio de referencia sección de publicaciones periódicas, Biblioteca "Dr. Nectario Andrade Labarca"
Ingles
RRP-014-002
Canadian university research expenditures and those of graduate students produce a groos static economic impact upon the Canadian gross domestic product (GDP) which considerably overestimates the net static impact of university research. Moreover, the net static impact, because it keeps constant the economic structure and the productivity of factors of production, does not account for the principal beneficial impact of university research the building of human capital and the transfer of knowledge (technology). All of this leads to an increase in productivity and, thus, in the size of the GDP. This effect is called the dynamic impact. This article, besides comparing succintly the groos impact with the net static impact, develops a practical method to measure the dynamic impact of university research. In a way, this method provides another benchmark, besides the peer review, to judge the relevance of university R and D.

3 de 5
A Cognitive Model of Innovation.
Nightingale, Paul
Research Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton, North - Holland - Amsterdam
Research Policy Vol. 27 No 7 Noviembre (1998) página 689 - 709
INNOVATIONTACIT KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE
Servicio de referencia sección de publicaciones periódicas, Biblioteca "Dr. Nectario Andrade Labarca"
Ingles
RRP-014-003
This paper develops a theoretical framework based on empirical case study research that explains the role of tacit knowledge in technical change and how scientific knowledge is used in innovation. It develops a theoretical argument that proposes that science cannot be directly applied to produce technology because science answers the wrong question. Innovation starts with a desired end result and attempts to find the unknown starting conditions that will achieve it. Scientific knowledge, by contrast, goes in the opposite direction, from known starting conditions to unknown end results. This difference in direction is overcome by following tacitly understood traditions of technological knowledge that co-evolve with technological paradigms, but are themselves outside the realm of science. The paper demonstrates how technologies are constructed socially and embody sociological and political conceptions of problems and appropiate solutions, but the theory maintains a very realist perspective. The Cognitive approach treats knowledge as a capacity that is emboided in the brain, and embeded in socialised practices, using the metaphor of pattern. The paper explores why scientific patterns cannot be perfectly extrapolated for complex, non-trivial technologies and shows why technical change is dependent on learnt tacit copceptions of similarity that cannot be reduced to information processing.

4 de 5
Innovation Policies Within the Framework of Internationalization.
Jacobs, Dany
Research Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton, North - Holland - Amsterdam
Research Policy Vol. 27 No 7 Noviembre (1998) página 711 - 724
CLUSTERSINTERNATIONALIZATIONINNOVATION POLICYKNOWLEDGE-BASED ECONOMY
Servicio de referencia sección de publicaciones periódicas, Biblioteca "Dr. Nectario Andrade Labarca"
Ingles
RRP-014-004
In this article, the reamining scope for national policy-marking in the framework of internationalization, especially in the field of innovation policies, is investigated. Four ideal-typical policy directions are sketched, which in actual policy-making are always combined: (1) adaptation to international requirements, (2) international co-operation, (3) policy competition as creative bookkeeping, and (4) national specialization or differentiation. For each of these possible directions, a 4 x 3 matrix has been composed in which four government roles (providing the necessary infraestructures, organizing and supporting necessary economic and political processes, providing the intellectual framework, and setting the overarching ambition of the nation) are looked at for science, technology, and innovation policy, respectively. The main thesis is that countries will have to go on combining these policy directions, but with a stronger emphasis on the fourth direction, i.e., national differentiation building on the upgrading and knowledge-intensification of already proven industrial strengths. Also, criteria are given on the basis of which the assessment can be which policy direction to follow in a certain case.

5 de 5
Small and Large Firms: Sources of Unequal Innovations?.
Tether, B. S
Research Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton, North - Holland - Amsterdam
Research Policy Vol. 27 No 7 Noviembre (1998) página 725 - 745
THE IMPLICATIONS OF UNEQUAL VALUES FOR INNOVATIVENESS BY FIRM-SIZEINTERPRETING (AND MISINTERPRETING) THESE FINDINGSINVESTIGATING THE ASSUMPTION OF EQUAL VALUESTHE DIRECT EVIDENCE FROM THE QUEENS AWARD APPLICATION FORMSEXISTING OBJECT-BASED RESEARCH ON INNOVATION OUTPUTS BY FIRM-SIZETHE INDIRECT EVIDENCE THE POST-INNOVATION PERFORMANCE OF THE FIRMS
Servicio de referencia sección de publicaciones periódicas, Biblioteca "Dr. Nectario Andrade Labarca"
Ingles
RRP-014-005
In recent years a number of studies based on innovation counts have found that small firms have introduced more innovations per thousand employees than their larger counterparts. This has been widely interpreted as indicating that small firms are more innovative than large firms, or that small firms are more efficient innovators than large firms. Such an interpretation, however, depends on the important assumption that, on average, the value of the innovations introduced did not increase systematically with the size of the innovating firms. This paper serves two purposes. First, it highlights this important assupmtion. Second, through a database of significant innovations introduced in the UK during the 1980s, it examines its validity. The analysis throws into doubt the widely held conclusion that small firms are more innovative, or more efficient innovators, than large firms.

Los resultados en: Libros Tesis Revistas Gacetas Videos
Búsqueda sobre: RRP-014 EN REGISTRO INTERNO ,
Registros: del 1 al 5 de 5
1
© Universidad Dr. Rafael Belloso Chacín, Derechos Reservados, Estado Zulia, Venezuela, 2011.
Dirección de Tecnologías de Información - Unidad de Servicios Web